Project: cow
Code Examples
/*
 * Copyright (C) 2010 The Android Open Source Project 
 * 
 * Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); 
 * you may not use this file except in compliance with the License. 
 * You may obtain a copy of the License at 
 * 
 *      http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0 
 * 
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software 
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, 
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. 
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and 
 * limitations under the License. 
 */
 
package com.actionbarsherlock.internal.nineoldandroids.animation; 
 
import java.util.ArrayList; 
 
import android.util.Log; 
 
/**
 * This subclass of {@link ValueAnimator} provides support for animating properties on target objects. 
 * The constructors of this class take parameters to define the target object that will be animated 
 * as well as the name of the property that will be animated. Appropriate set/get functions 
 * are then determined internally and the animation will call these functions as necessary to 
 * animate the property. 
 * 
 * @see #setPropertyName(String) 
 * 
 */
 
public final class ObjectAnimator extends ValueAnimator { 
    private static final boolean DBG = false
 
    // The target object on which the property exists, set in the constructor 
    private Object mTarget; 
 
    private String mPropertyName; 
 
    //private Property mProperty; 
 
    /**
     * Sets the name of the property that will be animated. This name is used to derive 
     * a setter function that will be called to set animated values. 
     * For example, a property name of <code>foo</code> will result 
     * in a call to the function <code>setFoo()</code> on the target object. If either 
     * <code>valueFrom</code> or <code>valueTo</code> is null, then a getter function will 
     * also be derived and called. 
     * 
     * <p>For best performance of the mechanism that calls the setter function determined by the 
     * name of the property being animated, use <code>float</code> or <code>int</code> typed values, 
     * and make the setter function for those properties have a <code>void</code> return value. This 
     * will cause the code to take an optimized path for these constrained circumstances. Other 
     * property types and return types will work, but will have more overhead in processing 
     * the requests due to normal reflection mechanisms.</p> 
     * 
     * <p>Note that the setter function derived from this property name 
     * must take the same parameter type as the 
     * <code>valueFrom</code> and <code>valueTo</code> properties, otherwise the call to 
     * the setter function will fail.</p> 
     * 
     * <p>If this ObjectAnimator has been set up to animate several properties together, 
     * using more than one PropertyValuesHolder objects, then setting the propertyName simply 
     * sets the propertyName in the first of those PropertyValuesHolder objects.</p> 
     * 
     * @param propertyName The name of the property being animated. Should not be null. 
     */
 
    public void setPropertyName(String propertyName) { 
        // mValues could be null if this is being constructed piecemeal. Just record the 
        // propertyName to be used later when setValues() is called if so. 
        if (mValues != null) { 
            PropertyValuesHolder valuesHolder = mValues[0]; 
            String oldName = valuesHolder.getPropertyName(); 
            valuesHolder.setPropertyName(propertyName); 
            mValuesMap.remove(oldName); 
            mValuesMap.put(propertyName, valuesHolder); 
        } 
        mPropertyName = propertyName; 
        // New property/values/target should cause re-initialization prior to starting 
        mInitialized = false
    } 
 
    /**
     * Sets the property that will be animated. Property objects will take precedence over 
     * properties specified by the {@link #setPropertyName(String)} method. Animations should 
     * be set up to use one or the other, not both. 
     * 
     * @param property The property being animated. Should not be null. 
     */
 
    //public void setProperty(Property property) { 
    //    // mValues could be null if this is being constructed piecemeal. Just record the 
    //    // propertyName to be used later when setValues() is called if so. 
    //    if (mValues != null) { 
    //        PropertyValuesHolder valuesHolder = mValues[0]; 
    //        String oldName = valuesHolder.getPropertyName(); 
    //        valuesHolder.setProperty(property); 
    //        mValuesMap.remove(oldName); 
    //        mValuesMap.put(mPropertyName, valuesHolder); 
    //    } 
    //    if (mProperty != null) { 
    //        mPropertyName = property.getName(); 
    //    } 
    //    mProperty = property; 
    //    // New property/values/target should cause re-initialization prior to starting 
    //    mInitialized = false; 
    //} 
 
    /**
     * Gets the name of the property that will be animated. This name will be used to derive 
     * a setter function that will be called to set animated values. 
     * For example, a property name of <code>foo</code> will result 
     * in a call to the function <code>setFoo()</code> on the target object. If either 
     * <code>valueFrom</code> or <code>valueTo</code> is null, then a getter function will 
     * also be derived and called. 
     */
 
    public String getPropertyName() { 
        return mPropertyName; 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Creates a new ObjectAnimator object. This default constructor is primarily for 
     * use internally; the other constructors which take parameters are more generally 
     * useful. 
     */
 
    public ObjectAnimator() { 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Private utility constructor that initializes the target object and name of the 
     * property being animated. 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. This object should 
     * have a public method on it called <code>setName()</code>, where <code>name</code> is 
     * the value of the <code>propertyName</code> parameter. 
     * @param propertyName The name of the property being animated. 
     */
 
    private ObjectAnimator(Object target, String propertyName) { 
        mTarget = target; 
        setPropertyName(propertyName); 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Private utility constructor that initializes the target object and property being animated. 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. 
     * @param property The property being animated. 
     */
 
    //private <T> ObjectAnimator(T target, Property<T, ?> property) { 
    //    mTarget = target; 
    //    setProperty(property); 
    //} 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between int values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. This object should 
     * have a public method on it called <code>setName()</code>, where <code>name</code> is 
     * the value of the <code>propertyName</code> parameter. 
     * @param propertyName The name of the property being animated. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    public static ObjectAnimator ofInt(Object target, String propertyName, int... values) { 
        ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, propertyName); 
        anim.setIntValues(values); 
        return anim; 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between int values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. 
     * @param property The property being animated. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    //public static <T> ObjectAnimator ofInt(T target, Property<T, Integer> property, int... values) { 
    //    ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, property); 
    //    anim.setIntValues(values); 
    //    return anim; 
    //} 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between float values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. This object should 
     * have a public method on it called <code>setName()</code>, where <code>name</code> is 
     * the value of the <code>propertyName</code> parameter. 
     * @param propertyName The name of the property being animated. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    public static ObjectAnimator ofFloat(Object target, String propertyName, float... values) { 
        ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, propertyName); 
        anim.setFloatValues(values); 
        return anim; 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between float values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. 
     * @param property The property being animated. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    //public static <T> ObjectAnimator ofFloat(T target, Property<T, Float> property, 
    //        float... values) { 
    //    ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, property); 
    //    anim.setFloatValues(values); 
    //    return anim; 
    //} 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between Object values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. This object should 
     * have a public method on it called <code>setName()</code>, where <code>name</code> is 
     * the value of the <code>propertyName</code> parameter. 
     * @param propertyName The name of the property being animated. 
     * @param evaluator A TypeEvaluator that will be called on each animation frame to 
     * provide the necessary interpolation between the Object values to derive the animated 
     * value. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    public static ObjectAnimator ofObject(Object target, String propertyName, 
            TypeEvaluator evaluator, Object... values) { 
        ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, propertyName); 
        anim.setObjectValues(values); 
        anim.setEvaluator(evaluator); 
        return anim; 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between Object values. A single 
     * value implies that that value is the one being animated to. Two values imply a starting 
     * and ending values. More than two values imply a starting value, values to animate through 
     * along the way, and an ending value (these values will be distributed evenly across 
     * the duration of the animation). 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. 
     * @param property The property being animated. 
     * @param evaluator A TypeEvaluator that will be called on each animation frame to 
     * provide the necessary interpolation between the Object values to derive the animated 
     * value. 
     * @param values A set of values that the animation will animate between over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    //public static <T, V> ObjectAnimator ofObject(T target, Property<T, V> property, 
    //        TypeEvaluator<V> evaluator, V... values) { 
    //    ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(target, property); 
    //    anim.setObjectValues(values); 
    //    anim.setEvaluator(evaluator); 
    //    return anim; 
    //} 
 
    /**
     * Constructs and returns an ObjectAnimator that animates between the sets of values specified 
     * in <code>PropertyValueHolder</code> objects. This variant should be used when animating 
     * several properties at once with the same ObjectAnimator, since PropertyValuesHolder allows 
     * you to associate a set of animation values with a property name. 
     * 
     * @param target The object whose property is to be animated. Depending on how the 
     * PropertyValuesObjects were constructed, the target object should either have the {@link 
     * android.util.Property} objects used to construct the PropertyValuesHolder objects or (if the 
     * PropertyValuesHOlder objects were created with property names) the target object should have 
     * public methods on it called <code>setName()</code>, where <code>name</code> is the name of 
     * the property passed in as the <code>propertyName</code> parameter for each of the 
     * PropertyValuesHolder objects. 
     * @param values A set of PropertyValuesHolder objects whose values will be animated between 
     * over time. 
     * @return An ObjectAnimator object that is set up to animate between the given values. 
     */
 
    public static ObjectAnimator ofPropertyValuesHolder(Object target, 
            PropertyValuesHolder... values) { 
        ObjectAnimator anim = new ObjectAnimator(); 
        anim.mTarget = target; 
        anim.setValues(values); 
        return anim; 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void setIntValues(int... values) { 
        if (mValues == null || mValues.length == 0) { 
            // No values yet - this animator is being constructed piecemeal. Init the values with 
            // whatever the current propertyName is 
            //if (mProperty != null) { 
            //    setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofInt(mProperty, values)); 
            //} else { 
                setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofInt(mPropertyName, values)); 
            //} 
        } else { 
            super.setIntValues(values); 
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void setFloatValues(float... values) { 
        if (mValues == null || mValues.length == 0) { 
            // No values yet - this animator is being constructed piecemeal. Init the values with 
            // whatever the current propertyName is 
            //if (mProperty != null) { 
            //    setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofFloat(mProperty, values)); 
            //} else { 
                setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofFloat(mPropertyName, values)); 
            //} 
        } else { 
            super.setFloatValues(values); 
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void setObjectValues(Object... values) { 
        if (mValues == null || mValues.length == 0) { 
            // No values yet - this animator is being constructed piecemeal. Init the values with 
            // whatever the current propertyName is 
            //if (mProperty != null) { 
            //    setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofObject(mProperty, (TypeEvaluator)null, values)); 
            //} else { 
                setValues(PropertyValuesHolder.ofObject(mPropertyName, (TypeEvaluator)null, values)); 
            //} 
        } else { 
            super.setObjectValues(values); 
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void start() { 
        if (DBG) { 
            Log.d("ObjectAnimator""Anim target, duration: " + mTarget + ", " + getDuration()); 
            for (int i = 0; i < mValues.length; ++i) { 
                PropertyValuesHolder pvh = mValues[i]; 
                ArrayList<Keyframe> keyframes = pvh.mKeyframeSet.mKeyframes; 
                Log.d("ObjectAnimator""   Values[" + i + "]: " + 
                    pvh.getPropertyName() + ", " + keyframes.get(0).getValue() + ", " + 
                    keyframes.get(pvh.mKeyframeSet.mNumKeyframes - 1).getValue()); 
            } 
        } 
        super.start(); 
    } 
 
    /**
     * This function is called immediately before processing the first animation 
     * frame of an animation. If there is a nonzero <code>startDelay</code>, the 
     * function is called after that delay ends. 
     * It takes care of the final initialization steps for the 
     * animation. This includes setting mEvaluator, if the user has not yet 
     * set it up, and the setter/getter methods, if the user did not supply 
     * them. 
     * 
     *  <p>Overriders of this method should call the superclass method to cause 
     *  internal mechanisms to be set up correctly.</p> 
     */
 
    @Override 
    void initAnimation() { 
        if (!mInitialized) { 
            // mValueType may change due to setter/getter setup; do this before calling super.init(), 
            // which uses mValueType to set up the default type evaluator. 
            int numValues = mValues.length; 
            for (int i = 0; i < numValues; ++i) { 
                mValues[i].setupSetterAndGetter(mTarget); 
            } 
            super.initAnimation(); 
        } 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Sets the length of the animation. The default duration is 300 milliseconds. 
     * 
     * @param duration The length of the animation, in milliseconds. 
     * @return ObjectAnimator The object called with setDuration(). This return 
     * value makes it easier to compose statements together that construct and then set the 
     * duration, as in 
     * <code>ObjectAnimator.ofInt(target, propertyName, 0, 10).setDuration(500).start()</code>. 
     */
 
    @Override 
    public ObjectAnimator setDuration(long duration) { 
        super.setDuration(duration); 
        return this
    } 
 
 
    /**
     * The target object whose property will be animated by this animation 
     * 
     * @return The object being animated 
     */
 
    public Object getTarget() { 
        return mTarget; 
    } 
 
    /**
     * Sets the target object whose property will be animated by this animation 
     * 
     * @param target The object being animated 
     */
 
    @Override 
    public void setTarget(Object target) { 
        if (mTarget != target) { 
            final Object oldTarget = mTarget; 
            mTarget = target; 
            if (oldTarget != null && target != null && oldTarget.getClass() == target.getClass()) { 
                return
            } 
            // New target type should cause re-initialization prior to starting 
            mInitialized = false
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void setupStartValues() { 
        initAnimation(); 
        int numValues = mValues.length; 
        for (int i = 0; i < numValues; ++i) { 
            mValues[i].setupStartValue(mTarget); 
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public void setupEndValues() { 
        initAnimation(); 
        int numValues = mValues.length; 
        for (int i = 0; i < numValues; ++i) { 
            mValues[i].setupEndValue(mTarget); 
        } 
    } 
 
    /**
     * This method is called with the elapsed fraction of the animation during every 
     * animation frame. This function turns the elapsed fraction into an interpolated fraction 
     * and then into an animated value (from the evaluator. The function is called mostly during 
     * animation updates, but it is also called when the <code>end()</code> 
     * function is called, to set the final value on the property. 
     * 
     * <p>Overrides of this method must call the superclass to perform the calculation 
     * of the animated value.</p> 
     * 
     * @param fraction The elapsed fraction of the animation. 
     */
 
    @Override 
    void animateValue(float fraction) { 
        super.animateValue(fraction); 
        int numValues = mValues.length; 
        for (int i = 0; i < numValues; ++i) { 
            mValues[i].setAnimatedValue(mTarget); 
        } 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public ObjectAnimator clone() { 
        final ObjectAnimator anim = (ObjectAnimator) super.clone(); 
        return anim; 
    } 
 
    @Override 
    public String toString() { 
        String returnVal = "[email protected]" + Integer.toHexString(hashCode()) + ", target " + 
            mTarget; 
        if (mValues != null) { 
            for (int i = 0; i < mValues.length; ++i) { 
                returnVal += "\n    " + mValues[i].toString(); 
            } 
        } 
        return returnVal; 
    } 
}